KNOW ABOUT YOU 

Health
Education
Going Abroad
Career Paths
Life
Love
Career
Finance
Business
Marriage
Prosperity in Business

  • Health

    Health is the level of functional and/or metabolic efficiency of a living being. In humans, it is the general condition of a person in mind, body and spirit, usually meaning to being free from illness, injury or pain (as in “good health” or “healthy”).[1] The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."[2][3] Although this definition has been subject to controversy, in particular as having a lack of operational value and the problem created by use of the word "complete", it remains the most enduring.[4] Classification systems such as the WHO Family of International Classifications, which is composed of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), are commonly used to define and measure the components of health. The maintenance and promotion of health is achieved through a combination of physical, mental, and social well-being, together sometimes referred to as the “health triangle”.[5][6] The WHO's 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion furthered that health is not just a state, but also "a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities."[7] Systematic activities to prevent or cure health problems and promote good health in humans are delivered by health care providers. Applications with regard to animal health are covered by the veterinary sciences. The term "healthy" is also widely used in the context of many types of non-living organizations and their impacts for the benefit of humans, such as in the sense of healthy communities, healthy cities or healthy environments. In addition to health care interventions and a person's surroundings, a number of other factors are known to influence the health status of individuals, including their background, lifestyle, and economic and social conditions; these are referred to as "determinants of health".
  • Education
    Educate" redirects here. For the journal published by the Institute of Education, see Educate~. For the stained-glass window at Yale University, see Education (Chittenden Memorial Window). Children in a kindergarten classroom in France Children at an elementary school in Xinjiang, China Girls at a secondary school in Iraq A lecture theater in New York City Education in the largest sense is any act or experience that has a formative effect on the mind, character or physical ability of an individual. In its technical sense, education is the process by which society deliberately transmits its accumulated knowledge, skills, and values from one generation to another. Etymologically, the word education is derived from educare (Latin) "bring up", which is related to educere "bring out", "bring forth what is within", "bring out potential" and ducere, "to lead".[1] Teachers in educational institutions direct the education of students and might draw on many subjects, including reading, writing, mathematics, science and history. This process is sometimes called schooling when referring to the education of teaching only a certain subject, usually as professors at institutions of higher learning. There is also education in fields for those who want specific vocational skills, such as those required to be a pilot. In addition there is an array of education possible at the informal level, such as in museums and libraries, with the Internet and in life experience. Many non-traditional education options are now available and continue to evolve. One of the most substantial uses in education is the use of technology. Classrooms of the 21st century contain interactive white boards, iPads, iPods, laptops, etc. Teachers are encouraged to embed these technological devices in the curriculum in order to enhance students learning and meet the needs of various types of learners.
  • Going Abroad
    Avi Nimni (section Going abroad) Going abroad: Between the years of 1996-2001, Maccabi suffered dark times on the field winning only the Toto Cup in 1998. This was due ... 11 KB (1,595 words) - 12:24, 6 May 2011 Kostas Chalkias (section Going abroad) Going abroad: At the end of the 2003/2004 season, Nikopolidis was let out on a free transfer to bitter rivals, Olympiakos , and a new keeper ... 10 KB (1,126 words) - 06:34, 4 May 2011 Valeo (section Going abroad) Going abroad : In 2005, Valeo launched a software services center in Egypt, under the name of VIAS (Valeo Interbranch Automotive Software). ... 6 KB (812 words) - 15:42, 26 March 2011 Anne Chamberlain From childhood Anne loved to travel, going abroad to a different Europe an country each year, later going to Canada and East Africa as a ... 5 KB (659 words) - 01:45, 20 February 2011 Jon Inge Høiland He then played for Bryne FK (1995–1996) and Kongsvinger IL (1997–1998) before going abroad. He played in Sweden for IFK Göteborg (1999– ... 4 KB (426 words) - 08:34, 1 May 2011 Pilies Street Many people visit the street to buy gifts at Christmas or before going abroad to visit friends. The market is also popular with souvenir ... 2 KB (314 words) - 20:30, 5 March 2011 Dionizije Dvornić After leaving Dinamo he spent four years at NK Zagreb before going abroad and ending his career in Switzerland. Dvornić made his debut for ... 3 KB (343 words) - 00:29, 1 May 2011 Clay Telecom International Data Cards, World BlackBerry offered to Array of Business Delegates, Leisure travelers, Corporates and Students Going Abroad ... 6 KB (776 words) - 10:35, 25 April 2011 Christino Martos it the unsuccessful movements of 1866, and was obliged to go abroad. ... He stuck to his democratic ideals for some years, even going to ... 3 KB (488 words) - 08:39, 14 November 2010 John Adams Jackson Going abroad in 1853, he visited Florence , where he created several portrait busts in marble, then went to Paris in 1854, where he ... 3 KB (420 words) - 16:19, 5 December 2010 Fulbright Program U.S. citizens are eligible to go abroad, and non-U.S. citizens are ... is a U.S. citizen interested in going abroad or a non-U.S. citizen ... 29 KB (3,737 words) - 12:14, 27 April 2011 Stefanos Athanasiadis (section Going abroad) Going abroad: His stay at Trieste was short-lived, however, as both he and his family could not adapt to their new life. After only a month ... 6 KB (829 words) - 20:43, 8 May 2011 Mentor Penelope As Mentor, the goddess encourages Telemachus to stand up against the suitors and go abroad to find out what happened to his father. ... 6 KB (706 words) - 22:30, 28 April 2011 Doshisha University Niijima left feudal Japan in 1864 when going abroad was illegal by Sakoku policy, at the age of twenty-one, and found his way to Boston ... 9 KB (1,007 words) - 15:02, 28 April 2011 Go Overseas Organization The company also has three sister organizations: Go Volunteer Abroad, Go Study Abroad and Go Teach Abroad. Mission: From GoOverseas. ... 4 KB (428 words) - 04:16, 1 March 2011 Student exchange program (redirect from Study abroad) from secondary school or university choose to study abroad in partner institutions. institution like student going for exchange where they ... 25 KB (3,636 words) - 21:03, 7 May 2011 Swallows and Amazons working as a journalist with the Manchester Guardian , but decided to become a full-time author rather than go abroad as a foreign correspondent. ... 10 KB (1,496 words) - 13:11, 7 May 2011 The Hotel Inspector also be an extra three 'special' episodes of when the show goes abroad. ... However, things are not going well: Kate and John face fierce ... 16 KB (2,585 words) - 21:39, 5 May 2011 Serbian diaspora Going abroad for temporary work as "guest workers" and "resident aliens" who stayed in their new homelands during the turbulent 1960s ... 9 KB (1,055 words) - 10:29, 13 April 2011 Khaled (horse) Going Abroad (born 1960) - won Hawthorne Gold Cup , set a new North American record in winning the Manhattan Handicap Corn Off The Cob ... 5 KB (556 words) - 16:39, 23 April 2010
  • Life
    Life (cf. biota) is a characteristic that distinguishes objects that have signaling and self-sustaining processes (i. e., living organisms) from those that do not,[1][2] either because such functions have ceased (death), or else because they lack such functions and are classified as inanimate.[3][4] Biology is the science concerned with the study of life. Living organisms undergo metabolism, maintain homeostasis, possess a capacity to grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce and, through natural selection, adapt to their environment in successive generations. More complex living organisms can communicate through various means.[1][5] A diverse array of living organisms (life forms) can be found in the biosphere on Earth, and the properties common to these organisms—plants, animals, fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria—are a carbon- and water-based cellular form with complex organization and heritable genetic information. In philosophy and religion, the conception of life and its nature varies. Both offer interpretations as to how life relates to existence and consciousness, and both touch on many related issues, including life stance, purpose, conception of a god or gods, a soul or an afterlife.
  • Know About Your Dreams
  • Career Path
    This article is about a person's occupational history. For the board game, see Careers (board game). For the films, see Career (film). Careers Look up career in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Career is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as a person's "course or progress through life (or a distinct portion of life)". It is usually considered to pertain to remunerative work (and sometimes also formal education). The etymology of the term comes from the Latin word carrera, which means race (as in "rat race", see Careerism). Contents [hide] 1 Historical changes 2 Supporting careers 3 References 4 External links [edit]Historical changes By the late 20th century a plethora of choices (especially in the range of potential professions) and more widespread education had allowed it to become possible to plan (or design) a career: in this respect the careers of the career counselor and of the career advisor have grown up. It is also not uncommon for adults in the late 20th/early 21st centuries to have dual or multiple careers, either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, professional identities have become hyphenated or hybridized to reflect this shift in work ethic. Economist Richard Florida notes this trend generally and more specifically among the "creative class". [edit]Supporting careers Career Assessments are tests that come in a variety of forms and rely on both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Career Assessments can help individuals identify and better articulate their unique interests, values, and skills. Career counselors, executive coaches, career development centers, and outplacement companies often administer career assessments to help individuals focus their search on careers that closely match their unique personal profile. Career counseling advisors assess people's interests, personality, values and skills, and also help them explore career options and research graduate and professional schools. Career counseling provides one-on-one or group professional assistance in exploration and decision making tasks related to choosing a major/occupation, transitioning into the world of work or further professional training. The field is vast and includes career placement, career planning, learning strategies and student development.
  • Love
    Love is an emotion of strong affection and personal attachment.[1] In philosophical context, love is a virtue representing all of human kindness, compassion, and affection. Love is central to many religions, as in the Christian phrase, "God is love" or Agape in the Canonical gospels.[2] Love may also be described as actions towards others (or oneself) based on compassion.[3] Or as actions towards others based on affection.[3] In English, the word love can refer to a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes, ranging from generic pleasure ("I loved that meal") to intense interpersonal attraction ("I love my partner"). "Love" can also refer specifically to the passionate desire and intimacy of romantic love, to the sexual love of eros (cf. Greek words for love), to the emotional closeness of familial love, or to the platonic love that defines friendship,[4] to the profound oneness or devotion of religious love. [5] This diversity of uses and meanings, combined with the complexity of the feelings involved, makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, even compared to other emotional states. Love in its various forms acts as a major facilitator of interpersonal relationships and, owing to its central psychological importance, is one of the most common themes in the creative arts. Science defines what could be understood as love as an evolved state of the survival instinct, primarily used to keep human beings together against menaces and to facilitate the continuation of the species through reproduction.[6]
  • Marriage
    Marriage is a social union or legal contract between people that creates kinship. It is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually intimate and sexual, are acknowledged in a variety of ways, depending on the culture or subculture in which it is found. Such a union, often formalized via a wedding ceremony, may also be called matrimony. People marry for many reasons, including one or more of the following: legal, social, emotional, economical, spiritual, and religious. These might include arranged marriages, family obligations, the legal establishment of a nuclear family unit, the legal protection of children and public declaration of commitment.[1][2] The act of marriage usually creates normative or legal obligations between the individuals involved. In some societies these obligations also extend to certain family members of the married persons. In cultures that allow the dissolution of a marriage this is known as divorce. Marriage is usually recognized by the state, a religious authority, or both. It is often viewed as a contract. Civil marriage is the legal concept of marriage as a governmental institution irrespective of religious affiliation, in accordance with marriage laws of the jurisdiction.
  • Career
    Career is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as a person's "course or progress through life (or a distinct portion of life)". It is usually considered to pertain to remunerative work (and sometimes also formal education). The etymology of the term comes from the Latin word carrera, which means race (as in "rat race", see Careerism). Contents [hide] 1 Historical changes 2 Supporting careers 3 References 4 External links [edit]Historical changes By the late 20th century a plethora of choices (especially in the range of potential professions) and more widespread education had allowed it to become possible to plan (or design) a career: in this respect the careers of the career counselor and of the career advisor have grown up. It is also not uncommon for adults in the late 20th/early 21st centuries to have dual or multiple careers, either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, professional identities have become hyphenated or hybridized to reflect this shift in work ethic. Economist Richard Florida notes this trend generally and more specifically among the "creative class".
  • Finance
    Finance (pronounced /fɪˈnænts/ or / ˈfaɪnænts/) is the science of funds management.[1] The general areas of finance are business finance, personal finance(private finance), and public finance.[2] Finance includes saving money and often includes lending money. The field of finance deals with the concepts of time, money, risk and how they are interrelated. It also deals with how money is spent and budgeted. One facet of finance is through individuals and business organizations, which deposit money in a bank. The bank then lends the money out to other individuals or corporations for consumption or investment and charges interest on the loans. Loans have become increasingly packaged for resale, meaning that an investor buys the loan (debt) from a bank or directly from a corporation. Bonds are debt instruments sold to investors for organizations such as companies, governments or charities.[3] The investor can then hold the debt and collect the interest or sell the debt on a secondary market. Banks are the main facilitators of funding through the provision of credit, although private equity, mutual funds, hedge funds, and other organizations have become important as they invest in various forms of debt. Financial assets, known as investments, are financially managed with careful attention to financial risk management to control financial risk. Financial instruments allow many forms of securitized assets to be traded on securities exchanges such as stock exchanges, including debt such as bonds as well as equity in publicly traded corporations. Central banks, such as the Federal Reserve System banks in the United States and Bank of England in the United Kingdom, are strong players in public finance, acting as lenders of last resort as well as strong influences on monetary and credit conditions in the economy.[4]
  • Business
    A business (also known as enterprise or firm) is an organization designed to provide goods, services, or both to consumers.[1] Businesses are predominant in capitalist economies, in which most of them are privately owned and formed to earn profit to increase the wealth of their owners. Businesses may also be not-for-profit or state-owned. A business owned by multiple individuals may be referred to as a company, although that term also has a more precise meaning. The etymology of "business" relates to the state of being busy either as an individual or society as a whole, doing commercially viable and profitable work. The term "business" has at least three usages, depending on the scope — the singular usage to mean a particular organization; the generalized usage to refer to a particular market sector, "the music business" and compound forms such as agribusiness; and the broadest meaning, which encompasses all activity by the community of suppliers of goods and services. However, the exact definition of business, like much else in the philosophy of business, is a matter of debate and complexity of meanings.
  • Prosperity in Business
    A business (also known as enterprise or firm) is an organization designed to provide goods, services, or both to consumers.[1] Businesses are predominant in capitalist economies, in which most of them are privately owned and formed to earn profit to increase the wealth of their owners. Businesses may also be not-for-profit or state-owned. A business owned by multiple individuals may be referred to as a company, although that term also has a more precise meaning. The etymology of "business" relates to the state of being busy either as an individual or society as a whole, doing commercially viable and profitable work. The term "business" has at least three usages, depending on the scope — the singular usage to mean a particular organization; the generalized usage to refer to a particular market sector, "the music business" and compound forms such as agribusiness; and the broadest meaning, which encompasses all activity by the community of suppliers of goods and services. However, the exact definition of business, like much else in the philosophy of business, is a matter of debate and complexity of meanings.
  • Selection of Profession
  • Problems & Their Solutions

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